Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Finally, the real winner...

...of the Isaac Braswell Fighting Chess Award from the 2012 Illinois Open.

A couple Reinfeldian truisms to consider:  A pawn on the seventh rank is powerful, but a rook on the eighth rank guarding a pawn on the seventh is meh. When all the pawns are on one side of the board, the knight's flexibility generally trumps the bishop's mobility.

Dmitry has been playing 3...a6!? off and on since the 1980s and is probably the world's foremost practitioner: whose idea was this, Gurgenidze's?

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Seriously, you get the award by beating somebody you outrated by over 400 points?

Bill Brock said...

I believe winner & loser split the prize.

Anonymous said...

Even more amazing! Now we award people for losing!!

Bill Brock said...

:-)

I was expecting, "Seriously, you get half of the award by losing to someone who outrated you by 400 points?"

You'd have to ask Sevan Muradian what his criteria were. But I think the focus was more on quality of fighting play than on the result. This game was not a Tate-like tactical exchange, but it was a true struggle.

Frederick Rhine said...

Lutikov played 3...a6 in 1978, but promptly transposed to a QGD with 4.Nc3 d5. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1389958 Gurgenidze played it three years later with what is now the "thematic" follow-up, 4.Nc3 c5. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1053543 Gurevich played the gambit 4.Nc3 c5 5.d5 b5!?, today the main line, against Christiansen at the 1983 U.S. Championship. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1054903 At the following year's U.S. Championship, Dzindzi (seemingly a comparative latecomer to the 3...a6 party) used that line to crush Browne. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1040271 But Alburt used 3...a6 thrice in that championship, scoring 2.5/3 against Seirawan, Tarjan, and Christiansen. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?node=758121 chessgames.com, at least, has many more games of Gurevich's with 3...a6 than it does of Dzindzi's. Nonetheless, perhaps undeservedly, the line is known as the "Dzindzi-Indian" or simply "Djin." Schiller wrote a book "Win with the Djin!" http://www.amazon.com/Win-Djin-Eric-Schiller/dp/1843821729

Frederick Rhine said...

Personally, I would have awarded the prize to Li-Gurevich way before I would have awarded it to this game. But I guess beauty and fighting chess are in the eye of the beholder.

Tam Nguyen said...

So are you saying I'm winning something for losing this game? My analysis is that 33.Bd1? was the turn around mistake. 33. Bg2 and the position is = (0.00 according to Rybka). with 33.Bg2 black can not make any progress, the rook is stuck defending the c-file, the knight can not move and black's king can not venture too far due to the promotion threat.
Tam Nguyen

Bill Brock said...

Plus (after 33.Bg2) you have the temporizing idea of Rc8-Rc7-Rc8, daring Black to make progress.

But it seems very human to me to want to point the bishop at the seeming target on g4 and away from the granite wall on d5. Humans are often wrong!